Habitat Atlas Legend Description
Symbol Description
The source of the Land Parcels layer is the Sunshine Coast Regional District. This layer has a source scale of 1:5,000 and was last updated in July, 2005.
The source of the Contours layer is the Terrain Resrouce Information Management (TRIM) map series. TRIM maps are produced by the BC governemtn at a scale of 1:20,000 using 1:60,000 aerial photographs. The contour interval is 20 meters with a horizonal positional accuracy of 10 meteres. This layer was last updated in 1992.
The source of the Roads layer is the Sunshine Coast Regional District. This information was last updated in June, 2005.

The Gravel Roads and Power Lines layers are derived from the Ministry of Forests forest cover database. These layers have a source scale of 1:20,000 and were last updated in 2001. The Gravel Roads are subject to frequent updates.

The Trails layer is derived from the following sources:

-Gambier Island Conservancy
-GPS Trail Surveys
-Halfmoon Bay Greenways
-Input from Community Members
-Ministry of Forests Recreation Features Inventory (March, 2002)
-Ministry of Forests Trail Maps
-Sargeant Bay Society
-Sprockids
-SunCoast Trails Society
-TRIM Trails

Trails from all of The above sources were merged together into a single layer of information. The source and date were recorded for each trail so that users of the Habitat Atlas can find out when and where the data came from. The source scale for the Trails layer ranges from 1:5,000 - 1:20,000 and was last updated in July, 2005. This layer contains all of the information available for trails on the Sunshine Coast and may be incomplete.

The Streams layer is derived from the following sources:

-TRIM Streams
-SHIM Stream Surveys
-SCRD Official Community Plan Documents
-Gambier Island Conservancy
-District of Sechelt
-Town of Gibsons
-Input from Community Members

This layer began with the 1:20,000 TRIM streams as a base. From there, stream segments collected as part of the SHIM surveys were added to the layer, replacing the TRIM lines. Similarly, input from community members was also added to the layer, replacing the original TRIM lines. The community input information was heads-up digitized with the use of 1:20,000 TRIM contours, 1:5,000 Land Parcels, and orthophotos. The source and date were recorded for each line segment so that users of the Habitat Atlas can find out when and where the lines came from. The final step was to incorporate the fish presence information. To do this, the fish presence distribution points were layered on top of the stream lines. The stream lines were then split at the highest point on the stream where a fish distribution point intersected it. The downstream portion of the stream was then selected and the fish presence information was added.

In the Habitat Atlas Mapbook, the stream lines are color coded to show whether fish presence has been identified. Streams classified as unknown fish presence represent those streams that have not yet been inventoried. The stream layer was last updated in July, 2005. It is important to note that this layer is made up of the best information available and may contain information that is incorrect or not up-to-date.

The fish species distribution layer consists of point features marking locations of where fish have been observed. The information is derived from the following sources:

-Fish Information Summary System
-SHIM Stream Surveys
-SCRD Official Community Plan Documents
-Fisheries & Oceans Canada
-Community Groups

The Fish Information Summary System (FISS) is a geo-referenced database of overview fish and fish habitat, macro-reach and lake classification data. It is a joint project between Fisheries & Oceans Canada and BC Fisheries. The FISS database can be accessed over the web at http://www.bcfisheries.gov.bc.ca/fishinv/fiss.html. This information has a source scale of 1:50,000 and dates as far back as 1979. It is important to note that this database does not have a regular maintenance schedule and may contain information that is no longer up-to-date.

SHIM stream surveys were conducted on the Sunshine Coast between 1998 and November, 2002. One component of the SHIM survey is to collect fish observations and fish habitat information. This information was collected with high-accuracy Global Positioning System (GPS) Receivers and has a +/- 10m accuracy.

Fish observations from the SCRD's Official Community Plans, the F&OC Community Advisor, community groups, and local individuals, were heads-up digitized with the use of 1:20,000 TRIM streams, 1:5,000 SHIM streams, and orthophotos.

The fish species that are found on the Sunshine Coast are:

- Aleutian Sculpin, Brook Trout, Bull Trout, Chinook Salmon, Chub, Chum Salmon, Cutthroat Trout, Coastal Cutthroat Trout, Coho Salmon, Dolly Varden, Kokanee, Lamprey, Northern Pikeminnow, Pacific Lamprey, Peamouth Chub, Pink Salmon- Prickly Sculpin, Rainbow Trout, Sculpin, Sockeye Salmon, Starry Flounder, Steelhead, Winter-run Steelhead, Stickleback, and Threespine Stickleback

With assistance from F&OC, the fish species information has been classified into the following 3 categories for the Habitat Atlas Mapbook:

1. Anadromous Salmonids
2. Resident Salmonids
3. Non-Salmonids

The Fish Stocking information was downloaded from bcfisheries.gov.bc.ca/fishinfobc.html into an excel spreadsheet. A point feature was manually digitized to correspond with each lake and stream that has been stocked. This information was last updated in July, 2005.

The source of the Eelgrass Beds is the Sunshine Coast Conservation Association in Partnership with SeaChange Marine Conservation Association. Polygons were interpreted from points collected on a boat using a GPS Receiver. This information was last updated in January, 2005.
The source of the Band Lands layer is the Digital Road Atlas of BC. This information was collected by GIS Innovations, Ltd., has a +/- 5m accuracy. It was last updated in March, 2003.
The source of the Agricultural Land Reserve BC Agricultural Land Commission. This information has been adjusted to fit the SCRD parcel boundaries. It was last updated in 2005.
The source of the Parks layer is the Sunshine Coast Regional District. This layer includes Provincial, Regional Use for Recreation and the Enjoyment of the Public (UREP), and Public Access areas. This layer has been fitted to the cadastral layer and has a source scale of 1:5,000. The Parks layer was last updated in June, 2005.
The source of the Beach Access layer is the Sunshine Coast Regional District. These points represent the locations of public access to the beach. This information was last updated in March, 2003.
The source of the Old Growth Management Areas (OGMA) layer is the Strategic Land Policy and Legislation Branch (MAL). Legally established and spatially defined areas of old growth forest that are identified during landscape unit planning or an operational planning process. Forest licensees are required to maintain legally established OGMAs when preparing FSPs. OGMAs, in combination with other areas where forestry development is prevented or constrained, are used to achieve biodiversity targets. This spatial view will show the most current polygons and exclude the sensitive information. The OGMA's were last updated in November, 2008.

The source of the Sensitive Ecosystems Inventory (SEI) layer is Environment Canada (Canadian Wildlife Service) and the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management. Inventory data was derived from aerial photography (1994 - 1999) and verified using selective field checks.

The Sunshine Coast Sensitive Ecosystems Inventory (SEI) has identified rare and fragile terrestrial ecosystems along the coastal lowlands from Howe Sound to Desolation Sound (including adjacent islands). The SEI is a "flagging" tool that identifies sensitive ecosystems and provides scientific information and support to local governments and others who are trying to maintain biodiversity.

The mild climate and long growing season of the Sunshine Coast support many rare plants, animals and plant communities - including several "at risk" species. However, rapid development along the coast is resulting in the fragmentation and degradation of terrestrial ecosystems. The SEI is a "flagging" tool that identifies sensitive ecosystems and provides scientific information and support to local governments and others who are trying to maintain biodiversity.

The SEI layer contains much information including Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Ecosystem Class, Ecosystem Subclasses, and Biogeoclimatic Zones. For the habitat Atlas Mapbook and website, the SEI areas have been classified by Primary Ecosystem Class. The website includes a reporting feature that displays all of the additional SEI information for each area.

Sensitive Ecosystems classifications for the Sunshine Coast are as follows:

-Cliffs (CL)
-Herbaceous (HB)
-Mature Forest (MF)
-Older Forest (OF)
-Riparian (RI)
-Seasonally Flooded Agricultural Fields (SF)
-Wetland (WN)
-Woodland (WD)
-Young Forest (YF)

More detailed information about the SEI initiative can be found on the Sensitive Ecosystems Inventory Website.